9/12 Don’t Miss Your Chance

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…To take a hike with oneforestfragment this Saturday.

Habitat Restoration in an Urban Forest Fragment   Saturday 9/15  1:00 – 2:30  

Join naturalist and forest steward Rosemary Bauman on this 1.5 hour hike, to learn what’s being done to revive native plant populations. Expect to see ripe Spicebush berries, hummingbirds in the jewelweed, and maybe a few last pawpaw fruits.   $10/ $7 for members. Please call 458-1328 to register.
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It does cost you – but it’s worth it! Here’s a preview of things we may or may not see and hear, as well as many more unimagined wonders…
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Ripening fruits are still hanging on the Pawpaw trees
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Spicebush berries are in their prime, often with thrushes lurking in the background
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We may hear a big woodpecker even if we don’t see one.
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Ditto for Peewees
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Hummers are still busy in the Jewelweed
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And we’ll see plenty of this, as well as other fall flowers: Carolina Elephants- foot, Ironweed, Wingstem, White Snakeroot, Jumpseed, and more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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7 thoughts on “9/12 Don’t Miss Your Chance

      1. tonytomeo

        Of course! No one wants an audience for such matters!
        I have an odd question about the paw paw. Do the trees smell bad while in bloom? Are they pollinated by flies? Okay, so that is two questions.

        Like

      2. oneforestfragment

        The answer to both is yes. The flowers are colored dark red like meat and smell putrid. Found this on wildlifegardeers.org “Corwin Davis in Michigan watched his flowering trees day and night to find out how they were pollinated, and found that green bottle flies were the main pollinators. These flies are called “carrion flies” and he had to hang spoiled meat in the trees to attract them. (Of course this could attract buzzards, too.) Fortunately a man in Kansas used a different approach. He collected pawpaw pollen from several trees, mixed honey with it, and put a little dab of the mixture on pawpaw blossoms. Bees in the area discovered them and pollinated the trees like crazy, which gave him a fantastic crop. He’d bribed the bees to work trees they wouldn’t touch ordinarily.”

        Liked by 2 people

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